King Cake Bread Pudding

King Cake Bread Pudding

This King Cake Bread Pudding will be a hit at your Mardi Gras luncheon.

King Cake Bread Pudding
Serves 12
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 1 (1-pound) brioche loaf, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  2. 8 large eggs
  3. 2 cups heavy whipping cream
  4. 2 cups whole milk
  5. 2 cups sugar
  6. 1/4 cup amaretto liqueur
  7. 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  8. Almond Glaze, recipe follows
  9. Mardi Gras Sugars, recipe follows
Instructions
  1. Divide bread between 12 (4-ounce) ramekins.
  2. In a large bowl, combine eggs, cream, milk, sugar, amaretto, and vanilla. Whisk until blended. Spoon egg mixture equally over bread, and let stand 30 minutes, occasionally pressing bread into milk mixture. Prepare bread pudding up to 2 hours ahead, if desired, then cover, and refrigerate.
  3. Preheat oven to 350°. Place ramekins on a rimmed baking sheet, and cook until custard is set in center, 18 to 22 minutes. Cool slightly, then top with Almond Glaze and Mardi Gras Sugars.
Louisiana Cookin https://www.louisianacookin.com/
Almond Glaze
Serves 12
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 2 1/2 cups confectioners’ sugar
  2. 6 tablespoons milk
  3. 1 tablespoon almond extract
Instructions
  1. In a medium bowl, add sugar, milk, and extract; whisk until combined. To thicken, add additional confectioners’ sugar; whisk to combine.
Louisiana Cookin https://www.louisianacookin.com/
Mardi Gras Sugars
Serves 12
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 3 cups granulated sugar, divided
  2. Yellow food coloring
  3. Green food coloring
  4. Purple food coloring
Instructions
  1. Place 1 cup of sugar into 3 quart-size resealable plastic bags. Add 5 drops yellow food coloring into one; seal, and shake to combine. Add 5 drops green food coloring into the second; seal, and shake to combine. Add 5 drops purple food coloring into remaining bag; seal, and shake to combine.
Louisiana Cookin https://www.louisianacookin.com/

4 COMMENTS

    • We’re sorry the wording was confusing! We’ve updated it to more accurately reflect the fact that the egg/cream mixture was not *yet* custard (it becomes custard when cooked).

Leave a Reply to Kathy Simpson Cancel reply

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here