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What's in Season in Louisiana?

The Secret to Superior Seafood

Nearly a third of the seafood landed in the U.S. comes from Louisiana. The state’s nutrient-rich estuaries, fed by the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, create an environment where delicious seafood thrives.

These estuaries provide a delicate balance of fresh and saltwater, which forms an ideal habitat for microscopic organisms that make the base of the marine food chain.

The Bayou State’s warm, fertile waters are particularly helpful to brown and white shrimp, so much so that Louisiana shrimpers land almost 50 percent of shrimp from the entire Gulf of Mexico (with an economic impact of $1.3 billion). For more information about Louisiana shrimp, visit LouisianaSeafood.com.

BUYING THE BEST

Whether the shrimp are fresh or frozen, it’s always best to start by checking the label so you can choose a domestic option. If you can’t find the country of origin on the packaging or signage, just ask. Fresh shrimp should smell like the sea and be free of any black spots.

If you have the option of buying whole, head-on shrimp, keep in mind that the head comprises about half the shrimp’s weight (so for 2 pounds of tails, you’d want 4 pounds of whole shrimp). Once you’ve chosen your wild Louisiana shrimp, make sure to keep them as cold as you can until it’s time to cook them. (Don’t be shy: Ask your fishmonger for a bag of ice to keep those tasty morsels cold until you get home.)

For more information, visit LouisianaSeafood.com.

Boiled, Grilled, and Fried – Louisiana Loves Shrimp

Whether the shrimp are fresh or frozen, it’s always best to start by checking the label so you can choose a domestic option. If you can’t find the country of origin on the packaging or signage, just ask.
Fresh shrimp should smell like the sea and be free of any black spots. If you have the option of buying whole, head-on shrimp, keep in mind that the head comprises about half the shrimp’s weight (so for 2 pounds of tails, you’d want 4 pounds of whole shrimp).
Once you’ve chosen your wild Louisiana shrimp, make sure to keep them as cold as you can until it’s time to cook them. (Don’t be shy: Ask your fishmonger for a bag of ice to keep those tasty morsels cold until you get home.)

GREAT AMERICAN SEAFOOD COOK-OFF

Each summer, chefs from throughout the country converge upon New Orleans to compete for the title of King or Queen of American Seafood. The Great American Seafood Cook-Off was launched in 2004 by the Louisiana Seafood Promotion and Marketing Board to help promote sustainable domestic seafood.

A panel of promotion and marketing nationally renowned judges score each dish in categories including composition, craftsmanship and flavor. After the king or queen is crowned, the fun continues with the Great American Seafood Cook-Off 4-H Edition. Agricultural clubs from across the country send their high school members to compete for their own bragging rights.

For more information, visit GreatAmericanSeafoodCookoff.com.

Shrimp Remoulade

1 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons ketchup
2 tablespoons Creole mustard
1 tablespoon prepared horseradish
1 tablespoon sweet pickle relish
1 tablespoon minced shallot
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
½ teaspoon ground paprika
½ teaspoon garlic salt
¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
2 pounds peeled and deveined cooked medium shrimp, chilled (tails removed)
Garnish: chopped fresh parsley

1. In a large bowl, combine mayonnaise and next 10 ingredients. Whisk until combined. Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours.

2. Add shrimp to mayonnaise mixture, and stir to combine. Cover and refrigerate until serving. Garnish with chopped parsley, if desired. Mixture can be made up to 4 hours ahead.

DIY REMOULADE BAR
Shrimp remoulade is traditionally served over lettuce, but that’s just the beginning! Treat guests at your next party to a variety of creative options, such as serving the shrimp on crostini, in a pasta salad, stuffed in fresh vegetables or on top of crispy fried green tomatoes.

Phenomenal Festivals

NEW ORLEANS OYSTER FEST

NEW ORLEANS

JUNE

ARTS AND CRABS FEST

LAKE CHARLES

AUGUST

LOUISIANA SHRIMP & PETROLEUM FESTIVAL 

MORGAN CITY

AUGUST

DELCAMBRE SHRIMP FESTIVAL

DELCAMBRE

AUGUST

LOUISIANA SEAFOOD FESTIVAL

NEW ORLEANS

OCTOBER

For more information, visit LouisianaSeafood.com.